Jardin des Tuileries

Jardin des Tuileries

Jardin des Tuileries, or Tuileries Gardens, are located between the Louvre and the Place de Concorde. They were created by Catherine de Medicis in 1564 to compliment the Tuileries Palace. The palace was burned in 1870 by members of the Paris Commune, but the gardens, through strife and monarchy, remain. Tuileries means "workshops," which is what occupied this area before the gardens came along.

The gardens were modeled from those in Florence, and were the most beautiful in Paris. They were opened to the public on a limited basis as early as 1667, but did not become a public park until after the Revolution.

Trimmed Trees

Trimmed Trees

Louvre Grounds

Louvre Grounds

We popped over to the Louvre to walk around the vast plaza. We weren't going inside today, but we're going to check out the I.M. Pei pyramids. I feel like I shouldn't like these intruders, but I do.

Louvre Pyramid

Louvre Pyramid

Mel Beside the Louvre

Mel Beside the Louvre

We strolled through the formal gardens, discovering the random contemporary art.

Vaginal Fountain

Vaginal Fountain

The RGB Booth

The RGB Booth

Tuileries Wind Vanes

Tuileries Wind Vanes

At the west end of the gardens, there is a terrace that overlooks the Place de Concorde. We arrived as afternoon was giving way to evening. The view of the Eiffel Tower was stupendous, with it's top half obscured by the low-lying clouds. We sat and gazed at the view for about an hour.

Disappearing Act

Disappearing Act

Eiffel Concealed I

Eiffel Concealed I

Eiffel Concealed III

Eiffel Concealed III

Eiffel Concealed IV

Eiffel Concealed IV